yin-meets-yang
m0rpheus:

black—lamb:

White people of Vogue be like:

 “check out our new Urban Tie Cap for your fall wardrobe! It’s totally new age! Totally innovative! Totally classy! Only $395!

Comes in 2 colors- Mayo White and Shh! It’s Black People’s Culture Black!

Pair it with “smoothed down angelic baby hair” and “cornrolls” for the perfect “It’s trendy when I do it, but ghetto when you do it” look! 

Yay! 

Get them before the next big thing pops up!

m0rpheus:

black—lamb:

White people of Vogue be like: “check out our new Urban Tie Cap for your fall wardrobe! It’s totally new age! Totally innovative! Totally classy! Only $395!

Comes in 2 colors- Mayo White and Shh! It’s Black People’s Culture Black!

Pair it with “smoothed down angelic baby hair” and “cornrolls” for the perfect “It’s trendy when I do it, but ghetto when you do it” look!

Yay!

Get them before the next big thing pops up!

yin-meets-yang
zooophagous:

prokopetz:

skittles-n-gravy:

perpetual-galaxies:

Jack is hardcore as fuck

scare me like one of your french girls

For money money, the most interesting thing about this confrontation is how completely it inverts the final scenes of a typical Disney film. In most cases, the hero is physically and/or supernaturally outmatched, and triumphs through determination and ingenuity; here, the villain spends the the whole fight running scared, while the protagonist casually no-sells everything that’s thrown at him. And there’s no ironic Disney Death keeping the protagonist’s hands clean, either. Jack just straight-up murders Oogie with malice aforethought while Oogie is running away - and by having Santa Claus himself strike the final blow, the film legitimises Jack’s killing of Oogie as the morally correct course of action.

You don’t fuck around with the motherfucking pumpkin king

zooophagous:

prokopetz:

skittles-n-gravy:

perpetual-galaxies:

Jack is hardcore as fuck

scare me like one of your french girls

For money money, the most interesting thing about this confrontation is how completely it inverts the final scenes of a typical Disney film. In most cases, the hero is physically and/or supernaturally outmatched, and triumphs through determination and ingenuity; here, the villain spends the the whole fight running scared, while the protagonist casually no-sells everything that’s thrown at him. And there’s no ironic Disney Death keeping the protagonist’s hands clean, either. Jack just straight-up murders Oogie with malice aforethought while Oogie is running away - and by having Santa Claus himself strike the final blow, the film legitimises Jack’s killing of Oogie as the morally correct course of action.

You don’t fuck around with the motherfucking pumpkin king